Risk assessments for Scouts

Introduction

No activity is without risk.

There is sometimes a fine line between adventure and danger.

As leaders we take the responsibility of looking after other people’s children very seriously.

For this reason we carry out a risk assessment on every activity and event we do.

Types of risk assessment

As a leadership team we carry out two types of risk assessment. Between the two types it is hoped that most accidents can be avoided, however no system is foolproof.  The first type is a generic written assessment of general meetings, events and some ‘specialist’ activities. The second are more specific ongoing risk assessments of activities, events and locations.  This is  undertaken before, during and after the event and taking into account changing circumstances eg weather conditions.

 

Our generic written risk assessments can be viewed online.  If you have any concerns or queries then please let us know.  Although our leadership team has many years of experience in Scouting, we don’t (and indeed can’t be expected) to know everything.  Being a Scout Leader is sometimes like being Peter Pan, we never grow up as the ages we deal with are constant, only the names and faces change. That’s where you as parents come in as obviously you know your child better than anyone.

If we have a child that has specific needs we will carry out a risk assessment before certain events.  There’s no hard and fast rule for this, but generally if we can forsee a possible problem we will try and work something out in advance.  For this reason it is important you keep any medical requirements up to date.  These can form the basis of our risk assessments.

 

‘Beyond comfort, before terror!’

Scouting is about pushing young people to discover themselves.  As unpaid volunteers the reward we get as Leaders is seeing the smile of someone achieve something they didn’t think they could.  It could be a small thing to you or me, but the sense of achievement from climbing a rock face, lighting a fire, or sailing a boat can change a young person forever.

 

So too, however, can an accident, and although we take appropriate precautions accidents cannot always be avoided.  As well as assessing risks before and during events, we always look back to consider how things went and whether anything could have been done differently, and our generic risk assessments are reviewed at least every 12 months.

 

Obviously we have robust time tested procedures in place for reporting any accident, but our aim is to prevent them happening in the first place. We hope we have covered all major risks, and they will be documented on the next few pages, but we can’t cover everything.

Our Risk assessments are for:

Normal Scout Meetings

One day activities

Overnight Activities

Camping

Public Events

These Risk assessments will be reviewed by 1st August 2017.